The Comic-Manifesto: COMICS ARE ART.

German comics are celebrated in the features pages, are translated into numerouslanguages and receive prizes and awards at international festivals.
Comic readings andcomic exhibitions enjoy high numbers of attendees, especially among the younger generation, and comics are increasingly the object of academic works. It is the comicillustrators, comic publishers and other actors who have gained recognition of theGerman comic practically without outside help. While film, music, theatre and other arts –quite rightly – are given public funding, the illustrators, scriptwriters and publishingemployees in the area of comics have only been able to achieve their considerablesuccesses by exploiting themselves. It goes without saying that they would have beenable to develop their potentials considerably better if they had had access to greaterresources.
The contemporary comic is formally innovative and its contents of high quality. Its spectrumranges from the comic strip to the graphic novel. Powerful stories on socially relevanttopics are characteristic of its image in the media today. The wide range of styles and theongoing experimental innovations stand for the artistic modernity of a medium whosevarious potentials are a long way from being exhausted.
No serious critic is in doubt today about the fact that the comic is an independent formof art that has earned its place on equal terms alongside literature, theatre, film or opera.
It is a scandal that this fact does not already enjoy general consensus.
We therefore demand that the comic be afforded the same respect as literatureand the visual arts and that it receive the corresponding funding. Like all other artforms, the comic depends on state and private support.

German comics are celebrated in the features pages, are translated into numerouslanguages and receive prizes and awards at international festivals.

Comic readings andcomic exhibitions enjoy high numbers of attendees, especially among the youngergeneration, and comics are increasingly the object of academic works. It is the comicillustrators, comic publishers and other actors who have gained recognition of theGerman comic practically without outside help. While film, music, theatre and other arts –quite rightly – are given public funding, the illustrators, scriptwriters and publishingemployees in the area of comics have only been able to achieve their considerablesuccesses by exploiting themselves. It goes without saying that they would have beenable to develop their potentials considerably better if they had had access to greaterresources.The contemporary comic is formally innovative and its contents of high quality. Its spectrumranges from the comic strip to the graphic novel. Powerful stories on socially relevanttopics are characteristic of its image in the media today.

The wide range of styles and theongoing experimental innovations stand for the artistic modernity of a medium whosevarious potentials are a long way from being exhausted.No serious critic is in doubt today about the fact that the comic is an independent formof art that has earned its place on equal terms alongside literature, theatre, film or opera.It is a scandal that this fact does not already enjoy general consensus.


We therefore demand that the comic be afforded the same respect as literature
and the visual arts and that it receive the corresponding funding. Like all other artforms, the comic depends on state and private support.